American History in Calhoun County

The Underground Railroad Sculpture in Battle Creek, MI
Jul 04 2017

American History in Calhoun County

In honor of the 4th of July, we want to celebrate all of the great American history our county has to offer! Here are some of the most important facts, in Calhoun County, that have a place in our great country’s history. 

The Underground Railroad
Marshall, Battle Creek and Albion were all stops on the Underground Railroad. Erastus Hussey, a quaker pioneer, was a Underground Railroad Station operator. He helped many slaves escape to freedom into Canada. There are many homes in Calhoun County on the underground railroad. Y0u can learn more about these stops in our geocaching guide. You can request it here. (http://www.battlecreekmi.gov/377/History)

Sojourner Truth
Sojourner Truth was a former slave, who made Battle Creek here home after visiting here in 1856. She was illiterate but fought for human rights and was highly respected for it. She permanently moved to Battle Creek in 1867. She is buried in Oakhill Cemetery. There is also a large monument dedicated to her when you enter the city from M-66.
(http://www.battlecreekmi.gov/377/History)

Cereal History
Battle Creek is credited with being the birthplace of cereal. Cereal was “accidentally” invented by brothers J.H. Kellogg and W.K. Kellogg. They were trying to find a healthier breakfast option for Seventh Day Adventists. You can find out more about how it was invented here.
(http://www.battlecreekmi.gov/377/History)

Marshall as the state capitol?
Marshall was once considered to be an option as the Michigan State capitol. The city eventually lost their bid to Lansing, but not before they built a Governor’s Mansion. The would be Governor’s Mansion is still standing today and is available for tours on Sunday’s or by appointment. Find more info on the Governor’s Mansion here.
(http://www.nationalhouseinn.com/marshall.htm)

Albion and Mother’s Day
Albion is credited as one of the first cities to begin celebrating Mother’s Day. On the second Sunday in May, Juliet Calhoun Blakeley, stepped to the pulpit to finish the Rev. Daugherty’s sermon. He was mad about an antitermperance group forcing his son to spend the night in a saloon. Mrs. Blakely spoke up about it in her sermon. Proud of their mother, her sons promised to always come back the second Sunday in May every year. The Albion Methodist Church began celebrating Mother’s Day in the 1880’s. (http://www.michmarkers.com/startup.asp?startpage=L1723.htm)

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